R & R Landscaping

Haters Gonna Hate

Claire Goldman1 Comment

This year has been so much fun! We’ve had the opportunity to get creative with our clients developing their designs. As a designer, it’s my job to get to know you, figure out what you are looking for in your yard – whether it’s functional or aesthetics. I need to know it all. Then, I sit down and create a space that will suit your wants and needs.

Part of getting to know you includes asking if there are any plants you love or hate. I get the same list of plants people hate all the time and I want to shed some light on three plants mentioned the most.

Juniper

Juniper

This is, by far, the most hated plant. When you hear Juniper, you think boring banks covered in it for erosion control. That’s not always the case! Juniper provides a unique texture and color contrast that’s evergreen. When used creatively, it can really be a show stopper! ‘Gray Owl’ Juniper gives a hazy silver/gray contrast to all the greens in the yard.

Boxwood

Boxwood

Again, these just have a reputation for being boring. People either love them or hate them. Boxwoods don’t have to be a hedge. ‘Wintergreen’ boxwoods are some of my favorites for their bright green color and shiny, cute leaves. Just because a plant doesn’t bloom, doesn’t mean it doesn’t have a place.

Crape Myrtle - There's something about a mature crape myrtle branch structure that's just flat out sexy.

Crape Myrtle - There's something about a mature crape myrtle branch structure that's just flat out sexy.

I hear it all the time – “These plants are too high maintenance! I don’t have time to prune them every year.” Lord, help me. PLEASE DON’T CHOOSE A CRAPE MYRTLE THAT NEEDS TO BE CUT BACK TO FIT THE SPACE! There are so many varieties of crape myrtles. You can choose one that has a mature size appropriate for the area they are planted. With the right variety, you can get a plant with beautiful blooms, outstanding fall color, and interesting bark.

Don’t just write off a plant because you think you don’t like it. It’s more about how it’s used than it is about the species of the plant. Hire a good designer and keep an open mind!